Premiere Bay Area Wedding Photography Blog by Trifon Anguelov Photography

1090 Clark Avenue, Mountain View, CA 94040 | (650) 930-0743 | http://www.trifonanguelov.com


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Elegant Asian Wedding at Memorial Church in Stanford University


Memorial Church in Stanford University is such an amazing location for weddings. Had the privilege to photograph Zhouxiao and Haomiao’s wedding. To see all images and read the entire wedding story, check the latest blog article on my website: Elegant Asian Wedding at Memorial Church in Stanford University

Both were amazing and I enjoyed very much capturing the moments. There is so much history and legacy related to this location.

Here is a slideshow highlight from their wedding day:

About the Author:

Trifon Anguelov Photography is a Premiere Bay Area Wedding Photographer in Mountain View, CA. Many clients in the entire San Francisco Bay Area have entrusted us with capturing their wedding days.

To learn more about the wedding photography services we offer and book a wedding or portrait appointment, visit our Wedding and Portrait Photography Site

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9 Tips For Becoming a Successful Photographer


Wedding decorations at backyard DIY wedding in Livermore, CA

Wedding decorations at backyard DIY wedding in Livermore, CA

Becoming a successful photographer is not easy. It is a long journey and never ending preparation to meet opportunities.

In my mind, being a successful photographer requires three major qualities:

   – ability to master the business side of photography profession: marketing, sales, general administration

   – ability to master the photography craft: gear, light, composition, post-processing

   – mental ability to handle the stress and maintain a positive attitude while dealing with clients

All three qualities are broad topics to cover in a single blog, so I will only focus on the third one: the mental ability to handle stress and maintain a positive attitude while dealing with clients. I am planning to cover the other two major qualities into separate blog articles.

So why is important for a photographer to maintain a positive attitude and be prepared mentally? Because this is the “glue” which binds the technical aspect (gear, light, post-processing) and the business aspect. It can make or break a business as neither one of the three qualities can be a winning one by itself.

So now that we know the “What” and “Why”, let’s explore the “How’. Here are 9 tips on how to prepare mentally for being a successful photographer:

1. Be Humble:

The truth is that photographers are not born overnight. It requires lots of efforts and dedication to become good at photographing subjects or objects. Which means that when you first start, you will be nowhere near where the rest of the photographers you admire or strive to be like are.

You will also make lots of mistakes and fail many times while learning. What is important is to accept that you will fail to be correct or do things as you planned to, and accept that you will have to work harder to get better. The worst disservice you can do for yourself is to believe that you can become very successful photographer overnight, that you will make no mistakes and that everything will happen to you from the very first try.

Being humble, admitting that you would need to get better over time and learning from your mistakes will take help you maintain a positive attitude when everything seems not to be going your way.

Related: Top 10 Mistakes Every Photographer Should Avoid

2. Don’t Get Defensive:

Getting defensive at the first sign or criticism or failure will destroy you mentally. Instead of seeing each obstacle or critical comment, as a “plot” to destroy your business or threat everyone else as they are trying to steal or harm your business, see it as an opportunity to improve your business and grow like a photographer.

For example: when someone at a wedding takes photos of the same poses you worked so hard to direct and setup, and then posts them before you on social media, instead of attacking this person and trying to remove the images, post your better and amazing images so others can see how much better photographer you are. Let you craft speak for itself instead of wasting energy to correct every single wrong that would happen to you.

Another example: Instead of trying to go after the bride and wave your photography contract in retaliation, after she asked someone to edit your images and ordered a big canvas from the edited pictures, analyze why it this happening.

Were your images not up to par with her expectations so additional editing was required or was something which the bride asked you to do and you didn’t deliver on it? Why there is a disconnect between your service and her expectations? What you can do next time to prevent this type of situation?

It is easy to get defensive and miss the opportunity to learn from the situation and improve your skills and business.

Elegant Wedding at Memorial Church in Stanford University

Elegant Wedding at Memorial Church in Stanford University

 

3. Be Prepared For The Unexpected:

There are two types of photographers. Those who hate to plan and use their imagination and skills to get the best of the light conditions and setup they have. And others who plan and research everything to the smallest detail before even go out and try to take a picture.

If you are the second type, then you need to accept that your plan would not always work. For many reasons, but the important part is not to try to desperately follow the plan even when is obvious that it was a bad plan in the first place. Instead, try to access and use the current light and set up to make the best out of it. Forget about your preconceived ideas.

Adjust and you will be amazed how differently your images would be when you allow yourself to see the moments, instead of planning them ahead. Life happens as they say.

4. Accept That You Will Be Rejected Sometimes:

No one books every single client they pitch an offer to. The same as not everyone who walks into a department store, always buys something from there.

Photography is a subjective and discretionary service. Different clients would have different tastes and would respond differently to different photography styles. Expecting that every client would book you and becoming dissatisfied when it doesn’t happen, it will destroy your self confidence as a photographer and long term prospects of becoming successful.

The best you can do, is to reach out to the client who didn’t book you and try to find out if there was anything you could have done to win the business. Or find out what the photographer who won the business did differently. May be there is something you shall consider.

Related: The Single Worst Mistake a Photographer Can Make

5. Stick With Your Business Plan:

Low paying jobs just take your focus away from becoming successful. You need to build and grow “YOUR” business not someone else business. Don’t chase any client at any price just to get some income while undermining your long term success. It will derail you from your path to becoming a successful plus would confuse your clients with pricing all over the place.

Why the friends of the clients you gave a big discount to, cannot get the same price? And did you put half efforts into their session for half the price you charged them? I know it is tempting to do post-processing or second shoot for other photographers, and that the extra money can help to get through a slow season. But if the time you are going to spend on it is giving you such a low rate of return compared to promoting your business and getting clients, why do it in the first place?

You would be better off to get one client on your own, instead of spending long hours post-processing images. And while second shooting is good to add experience and portfolio images in the very beginning of your career, later when your hourly rate increases, you would need to do lots of second shooter jobs to make up for your pay rate.

Elegant Wedding at Memorial Church in Stanford University

Elegant Wedding at Memorial Church in Stanford University

 

6. Seek and Learn from Constructive Criticism:

The biggest mistake many photographers make when participating in discussions is to take the feedback for their images or craft, personally.

There is a grain of truth in every feedback, so learn how to find it, understand it and tweak your workflow or techniques. When listening to a feedback different that yours, you are gaining insights into how others perceive your images, workflow, business practices. It is true that people can be very opinionated online and you have to put efforts to filter the gold nuggets from the chunks of coal you would get, but don’t blank reject anything which is not praising you and feeding your ego.

Your friends will tell you what you want to hear because they don’t want to hurt your feelings. They would like even the most awful images you post because they want to remain your friends. Your clients on the other side are not your friends, although some would later follow you on social media and befriend you. You will be operating a business and in business the one who delivers the best value to its clients becomes successful.

Feel free to follow Trifon Anguelov Photography on Social Media.

So don’t be afraid to seek feedback from different sources and not from your friends or immediate family only. This will help you to realize how to improve and growth. Otherwise, you would be risking to live and feel secure in the friendship’s bubble the friendship and would make you less inclined to look into improvements.

So try to see both sides of the equation. Unless you consider yourself the master of the photography craft already and don’t want to improve at all.

7. Experiment:

We all learn by practicing and by learning from our mistakes. It’s like first learning how to walk or ride a bicycle. One needs to try and learn on its own how to get good at something. There will be many trials and failed attempts before we can master something.

Our brains are designed to store successful patterns only after we experienced the failed ones. So, when on location working with a client, try to first nail down the “must have” shots. Then do a few experiments with a new technique or composition. Have at least one of two new poses or techniques try on each session.

Don’t count them as must have but as a learning opportunity. After you master it, add to the workflow. Then continue… Look for fresh ideas. Try a different technique or perspectives.

Related: So You Bouth a Brand New DSLR and Lenses And Now What?

8. Review Your Work Regularly and Keep Your Blunders:

Keep the bad shots you took and think about why they happened. This is a valuable tool to grow as a photographer. If you don’t do it, you will repeat them again.

You need to learn to avoid them and fix your techniques By keeping your blunders around is also useful to see how you are progressing and growing as a photographer. Over time you should see your images becoming better and better. Look for the errors you did in the past and are they still present in your latest images. Analyze why an image doesn’t look “right” and what is causing it.

How you can make it look better next time? You need to have something to compare to in order to get better. I understand that you might be itching to destroy these “bad” images forever, but keeping and using them to grade your progress would be worth the effort.

Elegant Wedding at Memorial Church in Stanford University

Elegant Wedding at Memorial Church in Stanford University

 

9. Be Part Of The Community:

Participating in different online and in person communities would help you learn and grow faster. The multiplication effect of utilizing everyone else knowledge to grow, is going to allow you to compound your gains and excel faster in the photography business.

Also by simply being on the receiving end and not contributing back with knowledge and experience is not the way how communities thrive and grow. As you learn and receive knowledge from others, so the others and less advanced can learn and grow from your knowledge and insights.

It is easy to ask for help and advice but not taking the time to share and help others grow. But if everyone does that, who is going to bring the latest ideas and information? Sharing and participating by contributing is how the entire photography community can grow and stay healthy.

Conclusion:

There are many successful photographers who worked hard and persistently to master their craft. There are also many who struggle to sustain and grow their businesses. The difference between both is the way how they approach and the decisions they make every single day.

It is important to understand what makes a business a success and how to not only sustain it but also grow it. I hope these 9 tips were helpful to give you some ideas to try on your own.

If you find it useful and interesting, please feel free to share with your friends or fellow photographers by using the share buttons below. We all can and will become better photographers by learning and sharing knowledge with others. If you have any comments, suggestions or feedback, drop me a line in the Comments section.

About the Author:

Trifon Anguelov Photography is a Premiere Bay Area Wedding Photographer in Mountain View, CA. Many clients in the entire San Francisco Bay Area have entrusted us with capturing their wedding days. To learn more about the wedding photography services we offer and book a wedding or portrait appointment, visit our Wedding and Portrait Photography Site


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Why Lithium Photography Flashes Are Here To Stay


polaroid cameraPhotography is an amazing type of art which invites creativity and offers endless opportunities for seeing and capturing the World around us. Many photographers from the early 18th century aimed to create unforgettable images or simply capture monumental or every day events around them. And they relayed on their equipment: camera, lenses, photography flashes, strobes and photographic paper. As technology improved over time so the different types of images in conditions not possible before grew exponentially. Night photography became possible with the introduction of flashes and strobes, low light photography with the advances of camera sensors producing low noise images.

It seemed like the camera flashes although adding HSS and wireless connectivity somehow still remained trapped to AA batteries for powering them. And as everyone knows, these are not exactly the most durable and powerful stored energy sources. AA batteries tend to charge slowly, drain fast and flashes powered by them require long recycle (the time between a flash pop and flash ready state) times.

So I was so happy to see Godox introducing their VING line – the world first rechargeable Lithium-ion powered hotshoe strobe. Two models V850 and V860C offer both manual and fully compliant TTL flash for both Nikon and Canon camera bodies.

As a manual flash, V850 uses lithium-ion polymer battery instead of AA-sized batteries and external power pack. This brings three advantages: fast recycle time, more flash times, and convenience. It is an all manual flash to fit camera flash brands e.g. Canon, Nikon, Pentax, Olympus, etc.

V850 is the manual flash which has single pin hotshoe and works with any camera in full manual mode. It has grade number of 56GN and with fully charged battery can produce up to 650 flash pops. Much better than 250 flash pops for most AA powered flashes on the market today.

V860C is the Canon compliant TTL hotshoe flash. It works in TTL mode with any Canon TTL compatible trigger as well can be used in full manual mode. HSS support for up to 1/8000 sec sync up is supported and does offer S1/S2 slave configuration. It supports 650 flash pops with fully charged battery too.

Godox also offers wireless triggers for their flashes. Two models provide both the basic trigger only capability and power management plus trigger model:

– FT-16S trigger it has single pin hotshoe, offers remote manual power adjustment of V850 and V860C and can also trigger (but not adjust power) other Godox barebulb flashes (AD180/AD360) and monolights (QT, QS, GT, GS).

– Cells II trigger is the fully compatible Canon TTL hotshoe trigger capable of catching the preflash signal. It can trigger V850, V860, Witstro AD180, and AD360 flashes in HSS mode. Very useful if you work in bright sunlight. You have to carry an FT-16S in your pocket to adjust power remotely.

One can find the manual flash V8500 for about $150 eBay.

The advantages of the lithium battery are multifold. Power equivalent to 12 AAs means faster recycle time and more pops. And changing the battery pack, it’s just one square block you can swap with one hand. I do expect the rest of the major flash manufacturers as Canon, Nikon, Yongnuo, Cheetah to follow suit and offer lithium-ion powered flashes in their line so photographers can have the freedom to shoot longer and with lower flash recycle times.

Agree, disagree, have another point of view on the topic? Drop me a line or add a comment.

 

Written by Trifon Anguelov

Trifon Anguelov Photography is based in Mountain View, CA and is providing Wedding and Events Photography services

To read more about me and my vision, visit my About page at: http://www.trifonanguelov.com/Info/About/


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Top 10 Online Photography Forums for Photographers


abstract photography by trifon anguelov photographerPhotography is an interesting and broad area of graphical art. With so many photography areas as: weddings, engagements, portraits, landscape, wildlife, documentary and abstract, it takes lots of time to learn and master. Most of the beginner photographers start with learning about the photography equipment: camera, lenses, filters, flashes and strobes. The amount of information one has to digest and understand is mind blowing.

And there are no shortage of information sources: books, DVDs, online classes, magazines, Youtube, blogs and forums. Once one start to follow the path of the “white rabbits” it takes him/her from source to source in a never ending conquest of knowledge.

However with all the written materials and produced videos, there are always follow up questions or doubts to be clarified before a concept is well understood. There is a photo to get feedback or provide feedback and validate ones vision or ideas. That’s where photography forums come to help. These are online communities where fellow photographer in all stripes come together to talk, bread and live photography on a daily basis. One can find a photography forum for almost every type of photography.

A word of advice: There are different photographers with different level of experience and different “agendas” participating into these online communities. From experts who are willing and happy to help, to thinking-they-know-all pseudo “experts” who derive their happiness from putting everyone else down and criticizing the majority of users and images on display, as well as very new to photography users who can have genuine but annoying basics questions. it’s a good idea to keep this in mind and don’t take anything personally or you might lose your sleep over aggressive comments and offensive remarks.

So if you are still looking to join one or more of these photography online communities, here are few for you to consider:

 

1. Digital Photography Review (dpreview.com)

Probably the most visited and used forum on Internet today. It has good user interface, plenty of categories: gear, techniques, weddings, portraits, wildlife. You name it. The members are very involved and provide very useful comments and information. it is truly international forum which means you will get responses while you are sleeping and more diversity, means richer information. As of April 2014, it has 35,945,300 posts and 3,643,231 threads. You can also find what camera, lenses and flashes the photographer used to take a certain image

 

2. Canon Digital Photography Forums (photography-on-the.net)

This forum was started by Pekka Saarinen and it is all about discussing Canon only photography gear and photography techniques. It also features showcasing images and critiquing. Required registration to visit all categories as the marketplace where users can trade, buy or sell user or new gear or access the nude photography category which are hidden from unregistered users. As of April 2014, it has 16,322,862 posts and  395,622 members.

 

3. The Photo Forum (thephotoforum.com)

This forum has wide variety of digital photography topics. The categories include contests, image critique, weddings, portraits, camera and lenses, analog/film photography, and much more. Moderated forum which means all comments will be reviewed and approved before being published. As of April 2014, it has 2,899,356 posts and 153,932 members.

 

4. Digital Grin (dgrin.com)

This forum is about photography gear, image critique and photography techniques. Many users posts their images and the feedback by other members is genuine and educational. It is moderated as well. Activity is slow but that means you can get more attention from the members and your posts doesn’t have to compete with many others for attention. As of April 2014, it has: 1,911,245 posts and 74,901 members.

 

5. The Professional Photography Forum (theprofessionalphotographyforum.com)

Started in 2009, this forums is a good mix of showcasing photography work, professional / business works, and photography categories as: wedding, portraits, landscapes, still, commercial, etc.). As of April 2014, it has: 69,991 posts and  1,201 users. It might be bit small and slow, but worth considering.

 

6. SLR Lounge (slrlounge.com)

This forum has topics about photography techniques and tutorials. It features weekly and monthly contests for its members with prices and incentives to be creative. The design is HTML 5 bases and has a cool look. As of April 2014, it has: 6,745 posts and 1,701 members.  Moderated by Christopher Lin.

 

7. Photography Corner (photographycorner.com)

Another photography forum which also includes marketplace for registered users. Topics include: general photography topics, camera, lenses, and a premiere member’s lounge. As of April 2014, it has: 771,231 posts and 28,533 members. Owned and moderated by Tim L. Walker.

 

8. Digital Wedding Forum (digitalweddingforum.com)

This forum is exclusively about wedding photography, wedding techniques and wedding photographer resources. Users share their wedding images and video for other users to critique and discuss. It has membership fee, which means it is not free to register. You have to decide if it’s worth it to you but judging by the total number of posts and members it seems like a good online community. As of April 2014, it has: 2,430,377 posts and 38,431 members.

 

9. Fred Miranda (fredmiranda.com)

This forum has wide variety of categories like: seminars, tours, gatherings, photography techniques and image showcasing. It has marketplace for registered users to buy or sell used gear well organized by manufacturer, gear class and features.  As of April 2014, it has: 1,301,411 posts and 191,411 members.

 

10. Photographycorner (photographycorner.com)

The forums is all about generic and gear related discussions. Members are active and provide useful information. Overall is a good place to share your work and get feedback. As of April 2014, it has: 65,599 posts and 3,121 members.

 

I am sure there are many more photography forums and information sources, but the above 10 is what I have found to be most useful and relevant to me. Think differently? Agree or disagree? Drop me a line or more in a comment section…

 

By Trifon Anguelov Photography

Portrait and Wedding Photographer in Mountain View, CA, 94040

http://www.trifonanguelov.com


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Finding Different Point Of Views To Take Your Pictures


Highlights, Texture and ShadowsEvery photographer has a style which he or she develops over the years. This includes first selecting a type of photography one enjoys and wanting to work in: portraits, photojournalism, architecture, events, weddings, engagements, maternity, children or baby photography. So many types to choose from but ultimately it comes down to how passionate one is about this type of photography and how much energy he or she is willing to put into it.

Then it comes the option of digital camera model and types of lenses. Does one pick Canon, Nikon, Sony or Fuji, Pentax? Also how much depth of field matters for the type of photography and style one already selected. Having the right equipment is an important decision every photographer has to make. it would influence the quality and look of the photographs one would produce. Not an easy or cheap choice if you ask me.

And will all the selections already made, then it comes the time for one to start practicing, getting experience working with clients and building solid portfolio. As some are better at the technical aspect of photography, this could be a quite a steep learning. Managing client’s expectations, booking appointments and advertising a business takes so much energy from the otherwise creating and pleasurable activity. Wasn’t all going to be interesting and creative, one might ask? Yes and not. Managing the business aspect of the photography business takes time and efforts.

So finally with choices made, gear available and clients coming for photo sessions, it’s all about fun, isn’t it? Well wanted to bring another point which each photographer should consider and this is: unique look and vision. Finding this secret ingredient which will make the clients whooa the images one produces. This means finding interesting compositions and creative points of view to frame the compositions. A photograph is just a framed one dimensional representation of  the reality around us. What to include or exclude, what to emphasize or what to diminish it up to each artists and creator. The reality can be shaped and represented in some many ways, which makes the portrait, wedding and engagement photography so interesting.

So what is the point of view? This is the angle from which the camera is positioned and subject appearance can be manipulated. Look from above is diminishing the subject dimensions casing it to appear smaller and shorter, while look fro below elongates the subject and makes ti appear longer. One technique which I have been experimenting with is the Dutch Angle. It creates a sense of tension and gives a dynamic look to each composition. For more on this point of view and to see examples, read this article on Wikipedia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dutch_angle

So in summary, photography is a very creative process and takes time to master. It requires lots of patience and time to get proficient into  and lots of efforts to constantly improve. Many factors contribute to becoming a good portrait or wedding photographer, but the good thing is that if one is committed it can only get better over time. I know I have been working to add more clients and images to my portfolio and client galleries at: http://www.trifonanguelov.com/Clients/

 

Have a different opinion, agree or disagree? Drop me a line or post your comment.

 

Trifon Anguelov Photography

Portrait and Wedding Photographer in Mountain View, CA

website at: http://www.trifonanguelov.com


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Smugmug vs Zenfolio: Photo Sharing Site Comparison


Abstract Image by Trifon Anguelov PhotographyA portfolio is a must for any visual artist: graphic designer, animator, videographer or photographer. It presents potential clients with quick overview of the artists best work and sets the expectations of what to expect. It helps to visualize the vision and experience of the artists into 8-10 pieces of work.

I as a photographer decided to build and maintain online photography portfolio so that my clients can see my best images. And not just the images but also post-processing skills which I have built over time.

And are there plenty of choices one has for online portfolio? Yes. Way too many. But after reviewing some of them I was able to distil the options to two which I decided to consider: Smugmug and Zenfolio. The good part is that both offer 30 days evaluation period during which one can test the features of each offering and take them for a “test drive”. At the end as all things in life, it comes down to making a decision.

For me the choice was Smugmug based on my needs and features which I think worked better for me. Here is the list of some of the decision considerations:

– Smugmug offered a complete customization (can write your own HTML and CSS, customize the headers and footers of the page, many menu options, custom HTML contact, info pages, etc) which is what I needed to tailor my website to my vision and needs

– Smugmug had much better website site-index (this is what search engines read to understand the website organization and crawl it, then add the results to their index). if you are planning to offer services and make money from the website, then you need to be placed higher in SE results and site-index helps

– There are more than 20 website themes on Smugmug to start with (you can stay with the default themes or use them as starting point and change to your taste and needs) as base foundation and them modify and customize. Having choices is better and having more choices is best in my view. I used one of the templates and them changed the background color, fonts, layout to come up with the final look for my photography website

– Smugmug offered access to up to 6 professional photo labs (including one I like BayPhoto.  Zanfolio uses MPix  which is also good choice) which my clients can order prints from. Again, lots of options is best as each client might have used one of the 6 labs in the past and feel comfortable with the prints quality, so the whole experience is better

– Smugmug customer support is more responsive (during the trials of both I had questions on how customize the templates and fount Semugmug support answered within 1 hour while Zenfolio took more than 6 hours)

– Smugmug picks up the image tags you assign in Lightroom and adds them to each image you upload. You can also add hyper-keywords to each image which are later being picked up and indexed by the search engines. This allows your images to be available in the images search for certain search terms (family photographer, baby pictures, etc). Gold when you need clients to find you online.

– Smugmug has up to 12 levels of gallery hierarchy (you can have Portraits (first level) : Headshots, Baby, Family (second level) : Headshots Male, Headshots Female, Baby Newborn, Baby One Months, Baby Two Months, etc (third level) etc. useful if you want to sell prints and need to organize your images by themes in different dimensions.

– Website customizations are available from grin Smugmug forums and many users have already shared examples of their layout customizations and HTML / CSS code.

– Smugmug offers a hierarchical organization of site layouts. On the top level there is a content that will appear on all pages, followed by a gallery specific content, and on the bottom there is a page specific content.  Each level can be customized and edited for the greatest flexibility in site customization. It’s bit more complicated than Zenfolio layout organization but once one understands it, is is quite easy to build and customize the site and pages.

– e-commerce on Smugmug allows much more customization and greater control over the pricing and offers much more merchandize options. For a starter,Smugmug offers much more print options of paper type, framing, gallery wrap, canvas, etc. – using photo sharing site on mobile devices is a must nowadays. I tested on both Motorola DROID and Apple iPhone mobile phones as well on Samsung Galaxy Note 10.1 tables. Some of my images were not displayed correctly on iPhone when using Zenfolio but on Smugmug the image rendering was working flawlessly.  While using Smugmug the images appreared sharper on Galaxy Note tablet compared to Zenfolio. Each Smugmug gallery has an option to apply default sharpening on all images from the gallery which I guess made the difference.

– The new Smugmug interface was recently released and new set of tools were added to further customize these templates and add in basic elements to further customize the front page or galleries: slideshow, HTML and CSS boxes. Adding to the website is as easy as drag and drop into the desired position and later customizing all the settings by drop down menus.

– Optimization for all three user devices: tablet, browser and mobile devices.  Rendering is adjusted for each screen size and I find the images and text are scaled down very accurately. Some long titles in the menu options wrap on mobile screens but it still looks very well.

– Social networking integration has been added to Smugmug by having complete set of customization to add and modify blog, Facebook, Google+ and Twitter links. These links can be added on both the front page, galleries and on each HTML page which makes is easy for your clients to share the site and pages with their friends.

– Lastly, Smugmug offers website usage statistics for the views per site, gallery and individual pictures which is useful to understand the visits and views of your galleries and site as overall. And if this is not enough or granular, there is seamless integration with Google WebTools and Google Analytics. Registration code is easily pasted into a designated field without having to modify any code or meta tags.

Decision however depends on how comfortable you feel on customizing photo sharing website and do you really need to do it. Zenfolio offers out of the box with less customization option, while Smugmug offers powerful customization but needs  HTML and CSS, web design knowledge for customization (out of the box is fine).

Whichever you decide to pick, look for discount promo codes. Most photo sharing websites offer promotions and why pay more. At the time when I made my choice, Smugmug was offering  20% discount. Bu so did Zenfolio as well. The market for photo sharing sites is very competitive and saturated so the competition is heating up and companies are offering sign-up discounts.

To see my photo sharing site and photography portfolio using Smugmug, visit: http://www.trifonanguelov.com

 

Think differently? Agree or disagree? Drop me a line or more in a comment section…

Trifon Anguelov Photography

Portrait and Wedding Photographer in Mountain View, CA, 94040

http://www.trifonanguelov.com


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Candid Portraits and Street Photography – What You need To Know!


Abstract Photo by Trifon Anguelov Photography Portrait photography is an interesting type of photography. Photographing live people individually or in groups allows a portrait photographer to capture different moods, feelings and personalities with its digital or film cameras. Because every human being is unique in their facial features and all of us express themselves in unpredictable and different ways, taking portraits never produces the same results. Single camera and lens with the same settings can produce completely different looks and portraits. Corporate headshots, personal portraits, kids portraits and family portraits. They all look different.

Some studio photographers use preset studio lighting to control the environment and look of their images, while outdoor or natural light photographers learn how to capture the best sun light at the right time. Other practice street photography and capture candid pictures of strangers which they will most likely never see again or get to know. The entire “picture by surprise” element yields such interesting images and unprovoked reactions that is a both trill and fun to do.

Traditionally, photographers are not obligated to ask for a consent or permission to take images from strangers as long as they are not trying to sell these pictures or otherwise benefit without the consent of the person being photographed. Most of the photographers are required to have model release form from the person being photographed first. But if one takes the images for their own pleasure and personal use, the law has been on photographer’s side.

Things are however starting to change. Many people concerned about their privacy are starting to put pressure on their governments to adopt laws protecting their privacy. The latest news comes from Hungary where the legislators passed a law to make it illegal to take pictures in public places without consent. So be aware and check with the laws in each country you are planning to visit about their street and on public paces photography rules.

To read more about the story: http://www.theguardian.com/world/2014/mar/14/hungary-law-photography-permission-take-pictures

Think differently? Agree or disagree? Drop me a line or more in a comment section…

Trifon Anguelov

Portrait and Wedding Photographer in Mountain View, CA, 94040

http://www.trifonanguelov.com